Wednesday, June 6, 2012

RIP Ray Bradbury (1920 - 2012): Something Wonderful That Way Goes

The incomparable Ray Bradbury has died today at age 91. Who can count the hours of wisdom and joy and invention he gave us? I tried to do justice to two of his incredible books, The October Country and The Halloween Tree. Mr. Bradbury, the 20th and 21st centuries needed your imagination, and you came through. Autumns won't be the same without you. 


(And thanks to my pal Scott Ross, whose charming quote gave me the title for this post!)

 
 
 
 

9 comments:

Jose said...

Wonderful tribute, Will. But I can't help but notice the precise time that this post was made...

Perhaps he's still with us after all?

Will Errickson said...

Holy... shit.

bloodstomach said...

Great post, Will. Something Wicked This Way Comes and Zen in the Art of Writing are some of my favorite books of all time. Ray Bradbury was in a class all by himself, and his passing was some very sad news.

Mauro Vargas said...

In some wheatfield, Drew Erickson has cut the blade of wheat of a genius.
RIP Ray Bradbury

Will Errickson said...

Ah, yes, I almost forgot about his Zen book! Loved that one.

Well put, Mauro!

lazlo azavaar said...

Goodnight sweet Prince, you made my childhood a better one.

Jerry Smith said...

Interesting post, covering with great info, I really I like it.. Are You Afraid Of The Dark

Chris Pearson said...

I can't believe how sad this made me. He was my favorite writer as a child. RIP. there will come soft rains i guess.

HueyLewis said...

"The October Country" is my favorite collection of horror-themed stories. The first PB editions also feature one of my all-time favorite cover illustrations that perfectly captures the flavor of the book.

http://toomuchhorrorfiction.blogspot.com/2011/10/october-country-by-ray-bradbury-1955.html

RIP to a great American author. That rare writer whose work can be enjoyed by adults and young adults, without insulting the intelligence of either group. If there's a silver lining, maybe this will mark a resurgence of interest in his books. His most famous work, "Fahrenheit 51", is remarkably prescient in its depiction of censorship and numbing new technologies that anticipate electronic surveillance, interactive "virtual" communications, and even reality TV. Not to mention the decline of the written word in bound form! So it is best read in "hard copy" format...